Research Team

Dr. Sibyl Diver is an interdisciplinary environmental scientist. She teaches at Stanford University in the Earth Systems Program, does community-engaged research on Indigenous water governance in Pacific Northwest salmon watersheds, and is co-director for the Environmental Justice Working Group at Stanford. For the past 20 years, she has worked on issues of Indigenous peoples and salmon around the North Pacific – in the Russian Far East, Alaska, Canada and the US. Dr. Diver received her PhD from the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at UC Berkeley, and has spent over twelve years partnering with tribal managers at the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources (California, US).

Dr. Daniel Sarna-Wojcicki is an independent scholar. Sarna-Wojcicki previously worked as a Project Scientist at UC Berkeley in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, where he received his PhD. His research has included working on the Klamath Basin Tribal Food Security Initiative in support of food sovereignty, sustainable food systems, and tribally led wildlife conservation in Indigenous communities and studying the history, politics, and social and ecological outcomes of collaborative watershed governance initiatives in the Klamath River Basin. He has spent over twelve years working with the Karuk-UC Berkeley Collaborative and partnering with tribal managers at the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources.

Dr. Carolyn Smith is an independent scholar. She has recently completed her Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley in the Department of Ethnic Studies, and received her PhD from UC Berkeley in the Department of Anthropology. She is also an enrolled descendent of Karuk Tribe, an artist and basketweaver, and a former board member to the California Indian Basketweavers’ Association. Dr. Smith uses decolonizing methodologies to study how the continuance of Karuk weaving practices relies on the ability of weavers and their allies to steward and harvest basket weaving plants.

Ron Reed is a tribal research review committee member, and project team collaborator. Reed is a traditional dipnet fisherman, a cultural biologist, and a member of the Karuk Tribe. Drawing on his role as a father, a culture bearer, and grassroots leader, Reed has developed plans for eco-cultural revitalization, led youth cultural education camps, and fostered collaborative research at the nexus of traditional ecological knowledge and western science. Reed co-founded the Karuk-UC Berkeley Collaborative in 2008 to support synergistic initiatives for eco-cultural restoration — an initiative that has since sparked a wide range of research collaborations between academic and tribal research partners in the mid-Klamath.

John R. Oberholzer Dent is a tribal research review committee member, and project team collaborator. Oberholzer Dent is a biologist working for the Karuk Tribe Water Quality Programs, with an undergraduate degree from Stanford University in Chemistry and African American Studies and master’s degree in Earth Systems. His research has included conducting water chemistry monitoring of cultural restoration initiatives, as well as publishing with collaborators at the California Indian Basketweavers’ Association to produce a community-driven analysis of the environmental justice leadership of Indigenous basketweavers in California.

Colleen Rossier is a project collaborator, and tribal research liaison. Rossier is the Program Manager for the Pikyav Field Institute for the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources.Her previous research has focused on agroforestry around integrating indigenous and Western science for resilient forest management— focused on edible, medicinal, and fiber species important to the Karuk and Yurok Tribes. She has partnered with the Karuk Tribe on collaborative research since 2013.

Shawn Bourque is a research review committee member, and project collaborator. Bourque is the Environment Higher Education and Research Division Coordinator for the Pikyav Field Institute for the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources. Bourque has contributed his expertise on project coordination and grants management to research and community-based initiatives on tribal food security, agroecosystem resilience, and restoration of cultural foods. His work focuses on allied approaches to advancing decolonization. He and his family are longstanding residents in the mid-Klamath.

Cole Dill-De Sa is a coterminal master’s student in the Earth Systems Program at Stanford, and a project team collaborator. His research background is in nearshore fisheries and fisher behavior, data analysis and synthesis, and ecology. Dill-De Sa is a Native Hawaiian scholar with a strong interest in environmental justice and resource management.

Nate Ramos is a coterminal master’s student in Environmental Engineering at Stanford, studying hydrology, and a project team collaborator. His research background is in policy analysis and modeling for water resource management, renewable energy, and equitable building decarbonization. His coursework has sparked an interest in community-based eco-hydrological restoration, building on his experience organizing around water access and Indigenous sacred sites in and near his hometown of Watsonville, California–Amah Mutsun territory.

Crystal Liu is a project team collaborator, and a Stanford University student pursuing a MS in Computer Science and BA in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity with interests in dam removal and environmental justice. They are supporting the research team on website and survey development.